AP English Language and Composition Practice Test 22

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Question 10 questions

Time 11 minutes

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Questions 1-10 refer to the following information.

The passage below is the text of a newspaper column published in the latter part of the 20th century.

PARRIS ISLAND, S.C.-He is seething, he is rabid, he is wound up tight as a golf
ball, with more adrenalin surging through his hypothalamus than a cornered slum
rat, he is everything these Marine recruits with their heads shaved to dirty nubs have
ever feared or even hoped a drill instructor might be.
5He is Staff Sgt. Douglas Berry and he is rushing down the squad bay of Receiving
Barracks to leap onto a table and brace at parade rest in which none of the recruits,
daring glances from the position of attention, can see any more of him under the
rake of his campaign hat than his lipless mouth chopping at them like a disaster teletype:
WHEN I GIVE YOU THE WORD YOU WILL WALK YOU WILL NOT RUN DOWN
10THESE STEPS WHERE YOU WILL RUN YOU WILL NOT WALK TO THE YELLOW
FOOTMARKS. . . .
Outside, Berry's two junior drill instructors, in raincoats over dress greens, sweat
in a muggy February drizzle which shrinks the view down to this wooden World War
II barracks, to the galvanized Butler hut across the company street, the overground
15steam pipes, a couple of palmetto trees, the raindrops beading on spitshined black
shoes. Sgt. Hudson mans the steps, Sgt. Burley the footmarks. They pace with a
mannered strut, like men wearing white tie and tails, their hands folded behind their
backs, their jaw muscles flexing. One senses that this is serious business. There's
none of the smart-alecky wisecracking of TV sitcoms that portray hotshot recruits
20outsmarting dumb sergeants for passes to town.
In fact, during his 63 days of training at Parris Island, unless a member of the
immediate family dies, a recruit will get no liberty at all. He will also get no talking,
no phone calls, no books or magazines, no television, radio or record players, no
candy or gum, one movie, one newspaper a week, and three cigarettes a day. Unless
25he fouls up, gets sent to the brig or to motivation platoon, and loses the cigarettes.
WHEN I GIVE YOU THE WORD TO MOVE OUT YOU WILL MOVE OUT DO YOU
UNDERSTAND ME? Hudson meets the first one at the steps like a rotary mower ripping
into a toad, so psyched he's actually dancing on tiptoe, with his face a choleric
three-quarters of an inch from the private FASTER PRIVATE FASTER JUST TAKE
30YOUR DUMB TIME SWEETHEART MOVE! MOVE! as this hog, as recruits are colloquially
known, piles out of the barracks in a stumble of new boots, poncho, laundry
bag and the worst trouble his young ass has ever been in, no doubt about it when
Burley meets him just like Hudson, in an astonishment of rage that roars him all
the way down to the right front set of yellow footprints YOU LOCK YOUR BODY AT
35ATTENTION YOU LOCK YOUR BODY. . . .
Or maybe Burley writhes up around this private to hiss in his ear-and Burley is
very good at this-you hate me, don't you, you hate me, private, you'd better hate me
because I hate you, or any of the other litanies drill instructors have been barking and
hissing at their charges ever since the first of more than one million Parris Island
40graduates arrived on the flea-ridden sand barren in 1911.
Until there are 60 of them out there in the drizzle with the drill instructors shouting
themselves hoarse, 60 volunteers who had heard from countless older brothers
and street corner buddies and roommates that it would be exactly like this but they
volunteered anyhow, to be Marines.
45Right now, with lips trembling, eyes shuttling YOU BETTER STOP THAT EYE-
BALLING, PRIVATE! fat and forlorn, they look like 60 sex perverts trapped by a lynch
mob. They are scared. They are scared as fraternity pledges during a cleverly staged
hell week, shaking like boys about to abandon their virginity.
It's a primal dread that drill instructors invoke and exploit in eight weeks (soon to
50revert to the pre-Vietnam 11 weeks) of folk theater, a spectacle staged on the scale
of the Passion Play at Oberammergau, an initiation that may be the only true rite of
passage to manhood that America hasn't yet scoured away as an anthropological
anachronism.

1. Several sections of the passage appear in capital letters and with almost no punctuation. This can be explained by all of the following reasons EXCEPT

2. In line 7, "daring" modifies

3. In paragraph 3 (lines 12–16), which of the following rhetorical devices is most in evidence?

4. The principal contrast employed by the author in the passage is between

5. The main rhetorical function of the description of Hudson and Burley (lines 16–18) is to

6. The point of view expressed in "In fact . . . day" (lines 21–24) is that of

7. To create the greatest effect, all of the following rhetorical techniques are used in lines 36–40 EXCEPT

8. In the last paragraph, (lines 49–53), which of the following words is parallel in function to "dread" (line 49)?

9. The passage as a whole might best be described as

10. Which of the following best captures the author's attitude toward the events and people described in the passage?