AP English Language and Composition Practice Test 50

Questions 1-11 refer to the following information.

Questions are based on the following passage in which Henry James responds to a literary critic’s ideas about the state of the English novel.

There is one point at which the moral sense and the artistic sense lie very near together; that is in the light of the very obvious truth that the deepest quality of a work of art will always be the quality of the mind of the producer. In proportion as that intelligence is fine will the novel, the picture, the statue partake of the substance of beauty and truth. To be constituted of such elements is, to my vision, to have purpose enough. No good novel will ever proceed from a superficial mind; that seems to me an axiom which for the artist in fiction, will cover all needful moral ground: if the youthful aspirant take it to heart it will illuminate for him many of the mysteries of "purpose." There are many other useful things that might be said to him, but I have come to the end of my article, and can only touch them as I pass. The critic in the Pall Mall Gazette, whom I have already quoted, draws attention to the danger, in speaking of the art of fiction, of generalizing. The danger that he has in mind is rather, I imagine, that of particularizing. I should remind the ingenuous student first of the magnificence of the form that is open to him, which offers to sight so few restrictions and such innumerable opportunities. The other arts, in comparison, appear confined and hampered; the various conditions under which they are exercised are so rigid and definite. But the only condition that I can think of attaching to the composition of the novel is, as I have already said, that it be sincere. This freedom is a splendid privilege, and the first lesson of the young novelist is to learn to be worthy of it. "Enjoy it as it deserves," I should say to him; "take possession of it, explore it to its utmost extent, publish it, rejoice in it. All life belongs to you, and do not listen either to those who would shut you up into corners of it and tell you that it is only here and there that art inhabits, or to those who would persuade you that this heavenly messenger wings her way outside of life altogether, breathing superfine air, and turning away her head from the truth of things. There is no impression of life, no manner of seeing it and feeling it, to which the plan of the novelist may not offer a place; you have only to remember that talents so dissimilar as those of Alexander Dumas and Jane Austen, Charles Dickens and Gustave Flaubert have worked in this field with equal glory. Do not think too much about optimism and pessimism; try and catch the color of life itself. If you must indulge in conclusions, let them have the taste of a wide knowledge. Remember that your first duty is to be as complete as possible—to make as perfect a work. Be generous and delicate and pursue the prize. (1884)

1. James draws a distinction between the purpose of the novel and

2. From the opening of the passage, it is clear that the author's attitude toward the creation of a work of art is

3. According to James, beauty and truth are directly related to

4. According to the fourth sentence, the word "axiom" can best be defined as

5. In the fifth sentence, "There are many other useful things that might be said to him, but I have come to the end of my article, and can only touch them as I pass," the pronoun "him" refers to

6. In the seventh sentence, "The danger that he has in mind is rather, I imagine, that of particularizing," the word "rather" is used to establish

7. According to Henry James, the freest form of art is

8. In the middle of the passage, the sentence " 'Enjoy it as it deserves,' I should say to him; 'take possession of it, explore it to its utmost extent, publish it, rejoice in it,' " includes an example of

9. In the second half of the passage, if the student follows the logic and advice of James in the set of sentences beginning with "This freedom is a splendid …" and ending with "the truth of things," that student would have to

10. Also in the middle of the passage is a sentence beginning with "All life belongs …" and ending with "the truth of things." The metaphor, "this heavenly messenger," contained in this sentence refers to

11. The overall tone of the passage can best be described as