AP European History Practice Test 14

Test Information

Question 10 questions

Time 10 minutes

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Questions 1-3 refer to the following information.

"It's come! It's posted at the district mayor's office," a passerby shouted at me as he ran. I reached the Rue Drout in one leap. … I read the message at a glance. … "The First Day of Mobilization Will Be Sunday, August 2 [1914]." … It was an announcement to a million and a half Frenchmen. … War! … Dead tired but exhilarated, I got back to [my newspaper's office] and burst into the office of Georges Clemenceau, our chief. "What is Paris saying?" he asked me. "It's singing, sir!" "It will be all right then[," Clemenceau replied].

Roland Doregelès, After 50 Years, c. 1965

1. From the passage, one may infer that Doregelès recalled that

2. From the passage, one may infer that Doregelès

3. From the passage, one may infer that Clemenceau

Questions 4-5 refer to the following information.

For the catastrophe of 1914 the Germans are responsible. … Germany, in this matter, was unfortunate enough to allow herself (in spite of her skill at dissimulation) to be betrayed into an excess of candour by her characteristic tendency to go to extremes. Deutschland über alles. Germany above everything! … There you have the ultimate framework of an old but childish race.

Georges Clemenceau, Grandeur and Misery of Victory, 1930

4. From the passage, one may infer that Clemenceau

5. From the passage, one may infer that Clemenceau believed

Questions 6-7 refer to the following information.

Read the the following quotation to answer questions.

What is tolerance? … We are full of weakness and errors; let us mutually pardon our follies. This is the last law of nature. … Of all religions, the Christian ought doubtless to inspire the most tolerance, although hitherto the Christians have been the most intolerant of all men.

Voltaire, Letters on the English Nation, 1733

6. From the passage, one may infer that Voltaire was participating in what cultural movement?

7. From the quotation, one can infer that

Questions 8-10 refer to the following information.

For a long time, educated Germans answered it in the positive, initially by laying claim to a special German mission, then, after the collapse of 1945, by criticizing Germany's deviation from the West. Today, the negative view is predominant. Germany did not, according to the now prevailing opinion, differ from the great European nations to an extent that would justify speaking of a "unique German path." And, in any case, no country on earth ever took what can be described as the "normal path."

Heinrich August Winkler, Germany: The Long Road West, Volume 1, 2006

8. From this passage, one may infer that

9. From this passage, one may infer that, prior to 1945,

10. From this passage, one may infer that the belief that Germany had a unique mission in history