AP European History Practice Test 15

Test Information

Question 12 questions

Time 12 minutes

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Questions 1-3 refer to the following information.

Read the following poster from Great Britain during World War II

1. From the poster, one may infer that

2. From the poster, one may infer that

3. From the poster, one may infer that some propaganda in Great Britain during World War II

Questions 4-6 refer to the following information.

Having by our late labours and hazards made it appear to the world how high a rate we value our freedom, and God having so far owned our cause, as to deliver the enemies thereof into our hands: We do now hold ourselves bound in mutual duty to each other, to take the best care we can for the future, to avoid both the danger of returning into a slavish condition, and the chargeable remedy of another war. … In order whereunto we declare:

1. That matters of Religion, and the ways of God's worship are not at all entrusted by us to any human power …

2. That the matter of [compelling] and constraining any of us to serve in the wars is against our freedom …

3. That in all laws made, or to be made, every person may be bound alike. …

Leveller Army Officers, An Agreement of the People, 1647

4. From the passage, one may infer that the authors of the passage recently fought in

5. From the passage, one may infer that the authors of the passage

6. From the passage, one may infer that the authors of the passage

Questions 7-9 refer to the following information.

We have, by this perpetual and irrevocable edict, established and proclaimed:

"First, that the recollection of everything done be one party or the other … during all the preceding period of troubles, remain obliterated and forgotten, as if no such things had ever happened. …

"We ordain that the Catholic Apostolic and Roman religion shall be restored and reestablished in all places and localities of this our kingdom and countries subject to our sway, where the exercise of the same has been interrupted, in order that it may be peaceably and freely exercised, without any trouble or hindrance. …

"And in order to leave no occasion for troubles or differences between our subjects, we have permitted, and herewith permit, those of the said religion called Reformed to live and abide in all the cities and places of this our kingdom and countries of our sway, and without being annoyed, molested, or compelled to do anything in the matter of religion contrary to their consciences. …"

Henry IV of France, The Edict of Nantes, 1598

7. From the passage, one may infer that

8. From the passage, one may infer that Henry IV decided

9. From the passage, one may infer that Henry IV

Questions 10-12 refer to the following information.

The assumption by a government of the office of Reliever-general to the poor is necessarily forbidden by the principle that a government cannot rightly do anything more than protect. In demanding from a citizen contributions for the mitigation of distress … the state is … reversing its function. … To enforce the fundamental law—to take care that every man has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man. … [But that] is quite a separate thing from insuring him satisfaction. …

The poverty of the incapable, the distresses that come upon the imprudent, the starvation of the idle, and those shoulderings aside of the weak by the strong … are the decrees of a large, farseeing benevolence. … When regarded not separately, but in connection with the interests of universal humanity, these harsh fatalities are seen to be full of the highest beneficence.

Herbert Spencer, Social Statistics: Survival of the Fittest Applied to Humankind, 1851

10. From the passage, one may infer that Spencer was an advocate of which nineteenth-century political philosophy?

11. From the passage, one may infer that Spencer

12. From the passage, one may infer that Spencer advocated which social philosophy?