AP European History Practice Test 16

Test Information

Question 10 questions

Time 10 minutes

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Questions 1-4 refer to the following information.

The principle which regulates the existing social relations between the two sexes—the legal subordination of one sex to the other—is wrong in itself, and now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement. … The masters of all other slaves rely, for maintaining obedience on fear. … The masters of women wanted more than simple obedience, and they turned their whole force of education to effect their purpose. All women are brought up from the very earliest years in the belief that their ideal of character is the very opposite of that of men; not self-will and government by self-control, but submission and yielding to the control of others. … If the general principle of social and economic science is … true, we ought to act as if we believed it, and not to ordain that to be born a girl instead of a boy … shall decide the person's position through all life."

John Stuart Mill, The Subjection of Women, 1869

1. From the passage, one may infer that Mill was an advocate of which nineteenth-century political philosophy?

2. From the passage, one may infer that Mill advocated

3. From the passage one may infer that Mill subscribed to which view of human nature?

4. From the passage, one may infer that Mill advocated

Questions 5-7 refer to the following information.

As with a Commander of the Army, or leader of any enterprise, so it is with the mistress of the house. Her spirit will be seen through the whole establishment; and just in proportion as she performs her duties intelligently and thoroughly, so will her domestics follow in her path. Of all of those acquirements, which more particularly belong to the feminine character, there are none which take a higher rank, in our estimation, than such as enter into a knowledge of household duties; for on these are perpetually dependent the happiness, comfort, and well-being of the family.

Isabella Beeton, Book of Household Management, 1861

5. From the passage, one may infer that the subject of Beeton's book was

6. From the passage, one may infer that Beeton believed that

7. From the passage, one may infer that Beeton believed that

Questions 8-10 refer to the following information.

Albeit the king's Majesty justly and rightfully is and ought to be the supreme head of the Church of England, and so is recognized by the clergy of this realm in their convocations, yet nevertheless, for corroboration and confirmation thereof, and for increase of virtue in Christ's religion within this realm of England, and to repress and extirpate all errors, heresies, and other enormities and abuses heretofore used in the same, be it enacted, by authority of this present Parliament, that the king, our sovereign lord, his heirs and successors, kings of this realm, shall be taken, accepted, and reputed the only supreme head in earth of the Church of England, called Anglicans Ecclesia; and shall have and enjoy, annexed and united to the imperial crown of this realm, as well the title and style thereof, as all honors, dignities, preeminences, jurisdictions, privileges, authorities, immunities, profits, and commodities to the said dignity of the supreme head of the same Church belonging and appertaining; and that our said sovereign lord, his heirs and successors, kings of this realm, shall have full power and authority from time to time to visit, repress, redress, record, order, correct, restrain, and amend all such errors, heresies, abuses, offenses, contempts, and enormities, whatsoever they be, which by any manner of spiritual authority or jurisdiction ought or may lawfully be reformed, repressed, ordered, redressed, corrected, restrained, or amended, most to the pleasure of Almighty God, the increase of virtue in Christ's religion, and for the conservation of the peace, unity, and tranquility of this realm; any usage, foreign land, foreign authority, prescription, or any other thing or things to the contrary hereof notwithstanding.

English Parliament, Act of Supremacy, 1534

8. From the passage, one may infer that the English Parliament wished to argue that the Act of Supremacy would

9. The passage can be used as evidence for which of the following historical trends of the time period?

10. From the passage and its historical context, one may infer that the Act was, in part,