AP US History Practice Test 17

Test Information

Question 10 questions

Time 10 minutes

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Questions 1-3 refer to the following information.

"An act for the more effectual protection of the property of married women:

"§1. The real property of any female who may hereafter marry, and which she shall own at the time of marriage, and the rents, issues, and profits thereof, shall not be subject to the sole disposal of her husband, nor be liable for his debts, and shall continue her sole and separate property, as if she were a single female.

"§2. The real and personal property, and the rents, issues, and profits thereof, of any female now married, shall not be subject to the disposal of her husband; but shall be her sole and separate property, as if she were a single female, except so far as the same may be liable for the debts of her husband heretofore contracted.

"§3. Any married female may take by inheritance, or by gift, grant, devise, or bequest, from any person other than her husband, and hold to her sole and separate use, and convey and devise real and personal property, and any interest or estate therein, and the rents, issues, and profits thereof, in the same manner and with like effect as if she were unmarried, and the same shall not be subject to the disposal of her husband nor be liable for his debts."

—Married Women's Property Act, New York State (1848)

1. The Married Women's Property Act was significant in that it

2. Which of the following groups would be most likely to support the perspective of the Married Women's Property Act?

3. The ideas expressed in the passage above most directly reflect which of the following continuities in U.S. history?

Questions 4-5 refer to the following information.

"The law of love, peace and liberty in the states extending to Jews, Turks and Egyptians, as they are considered sonnes of Adam, which is the glory of the outward state of Holland, soe love, peace and liberty, extending to all in Christ Jesus, condemns hatred, war and bondage. And because our Saviour sayeth it is impossible but that offences will come, but woe unto him by whom they cometh, our desire is not to offend one of his little ones, in whatsoever form, name or title hee appears in, whether Presbyterian, Independent, Baptist or Quaker, but shall be glad to see anything of God in any of them, desiring to doe unto all men as we desire all men should doe unto us, which is the true law both of Church and State; for our Saviour sayeth this is the law and the prophets.

"Therefore if any of these said persons come in love unto us, we cannot in conscience lay violent hands upon them, but give them free egresse and regresse unto our Town, and houses, as God shall persuade our consciences, for we are bounde by the law of God and man to doe good unto all men and evil to noe man. And this is according to the patent and charter of our Towne, given unto us in the name of the States General, which we are not willing to infringe, and violate, but shall houlde to our patent and shall remaine, your humble subjects, the inhabitants of Vlishing (Flushing, part of the colony of New Netherlands)."

—The Flushing Remonstrance, 1657

4. Which of the following most accurately describes the context in which the above document was written?

5. Which of the following was most significant in enshrining into the U.S. legal structure the ideas contained in the Flushing Remonstrance?

Questions 6-7 refer to the following information.

"The petition of several poor negroes and mulattoes, who are inhabitants of the town of Dartmouth, humbly showeth,—

"That we being chiefly of the African extract, and by reason of long bondage and hard slavery, we have been deprived of enjoying the profits of our labor or the advantage of inheriting estates from our parents, as our neighbors the white people do, having some of us not long enjoyed our own freedom; yet of late, contrary to the invariable custom and practice of the country, we have been, and now are, taxed both in our polls and that small pittance of estate which, through much hard labor and industry, we have got together to sustain ourselves and families withall. We apprehend it, therefore, to be hard usage, and will doubtless (if continued) reduce us to a state of beggary, whereby we shall become a burthen to others, if not timely prevented by the interposition of your justice and your power.

"Your petitioners further show, that we apprehend ourselves to be aggrieved, in that, while we are not allowed the privilege of freemen of the State, having no vote or influence in the election of those that tax us, yet many of our colour (as is well known) have cheerfully entered the field of battle in the defence of the common cause, and that (as we conceive) against a similar exertion of power (in regard to taxation), too well known to need a recital in this place."

—Paul Cuffe's Petition, Massachusetts, 1780

6. The main purpose of the petition by Paul Cuffe, excerpted above, was to demand

7. The petition by Paul Cuffe, above, best illustrates which of the following developments?

Questions 8-10 refer to the following information.

8. Which of the following statements most accurately describes the main point of this cartoon?

9. Which other historical time period could have elicited a similar political cartoon?

10. Which of the following actions would this cartoonist most likely have criticized?