AP World History: Modern Long-Essay Question Strategy

Long-Essay Question

The long-essay question will test your ability to analyze continuity and change over time and/or to compare a society, event, theme, or process. You have the opportunity to select one of three essays on this part of the exam. The suggested writing time for this essay is 40 minutes, including 5 minutes devoted to prewriting.

The following are the elements that you must address to succeed on the long essay:

1. Present a thesis that makes a historically defensible claim and responds to all parts of the question. The thesis must include one or more sentences located in one place, either in the introduction or the conclusion.

2. Describe similarities AND differences among historical persons, events, developments, or processes.

3. Identify and explain the reasons for similarities AND differences among historical persons, events, developments, or processes. OR, DEPENDING ON THE PROMPT, evaluate the relative significance of historical persons, events, developments, or processes.

4. Describe causes AND/OR effects of a historical event, development, or process. AND explain the reasons for the causes AND/OR effects of a historical event, development, or process. If the prompt requires discussion of both causes and effects, responses must address both causes and effects in order to earn both points.

5. CCOT: Describe historical continuity AND change over time. Explain the reasons for historical continuity AND change over time.

6. Describe the ways in which historical development specified in the prompt was different from and similar to developments that preceded AND/OR followed.

7. Explain the extent to which the historical development specified in the prompt was different from and similar to developments that preceded AND/OR followed.

8. Address the topic of the question with specific examples of relevant evidence.

9. Use specific examples of evidence to fully and effectively substantiate the stated thesis or a relevant argument.

10. Extend the argument by explaining the connections between the argument and ONE of the following:

a) A development in a different historical period, situation, era, or geographical era

b) A course theme and/or approach to history that is not the focus of the essay (such as political, economic, social, cultural, or intellectual history)

c) A different discipline or field of inquiry

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